Syllabus ARTC 3100 - Animation Principles & Techniques


Instructor: Nana (Xiao) Yang
Email: yangx@bgsu.edu
Office: 202 Fine Arts Building
Office Hours: Mon 2-3pm

Section: 1001/1002
Semester: Spring 2017
Lab: 244 Wolfe Center
Time: M/W 11:30am-1:50pm


Prerequisites

ARTC 2210 Digital Imaging


Description and Objectives

Exploration of traditional and experimental animation language and techniques with an emphasis on the basic principles of animation. The course includes exploration of animation techniques and focus on developing sense of timing, staging, and concept-driven studio production.


Course Methods

Students in this class will learn a number of traditional and experimental animation techniques in an effort to produce a series of short artistic animations. The students will learn about concept development, working with time, and how to employ art and design elements to help convey ideas that affect the audience on a cognitive and emotional level. The students will work independently or in a small group to develop a longer animation that will be ready to send to festivals.


Course Expectations

Each student is expected to complete all projects, exercises, in-class exercises, readings, research projects, and the final project. Details of the various assignments will be discussed in class.

By the end of the course, all projects should become part of the art portfolio.

During class time, students are expected to engage in meaningful classroom participation.

No Facebook, game playing, texting or other non-class-related activities are allowed during class time.


Supplies

Digital storage:

External Drive (formatted for both Mac and PC), or Flash Drive.

SD CARD for camera (8GB or more)

Materials:

1 Micron 08 #1 Archival Ink Pen (.050 mm line width)

Note (Index) cards - 4" x 6" plain (not lined)

Sketch book

Drawing supplies and paper

Materials necessary for various stop motion techniques (puppet animation, etc.)


Recommended Readings

  • The Animation Book: A Complete Guide to Animated Filmmaking--From Flip-Books to Sound Cartoons to 3- D Animation by Kit Laybourne

  • The Art of Stop-motion Animation by Ken A Priebe

  • Frame-by-frame Stop Motion: The Guide to Non-traditional Animation Techniques by Tom Gasek

  • The Animation Bible: A Practical Guide to the Art of Animating from Flipbooks to Flash by Maureen Furniss

Attendance

Attendance is mandatory. We will be covering a variety of materials throughout the semester. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility meet with a classmate or make an appointment with me to get the information.

  • All absences affect your attendance grade which will lower your overall grade
  • 4 unexcused absences = fail the course; dropping the course strongly recommended

Being 15 minutes or more late to class three times will count as one unexcused absence.
Leaving class early (15 minutes or more) three times will count as an absence.


Assignments and Critiques

Turning in Projects
Projects are due in the Homework folder prior to the beginning of class.

Revised projects are due exactly one week from the critique date. I do not accept late revised projects and you will receive a zero on the revised project if it is NOT turned in on time.

Critiques
If you miss a regular critique, the project for that critique will be lowered by one letter grade.

During critiques, I expect each student's full attention and respect. Monitors will be TURNED OFF during critiques. Critiques begin promptly at the beginning of the class.

Final Critique
Attendance at the Final critique is mandatory. Missing the final critique will result in an F for the Final Project. NO late Final Projects will be accepted!


Time Commitment and Production Room Signup

The assignments will require significant time outside of class to produce. Plan accordingly.

You MUST make progress each week on your long animation so that you can complete it before the end of the semester.

Students will each sign up for 5 hours a week on the animation copy stand. You MUST utilize your time or trade it with someone else.

You are not allowed to go over your copystand allocated time unless no one is signed up after you.

You may sign up for additional time beyond your 5 hours after everyone has a chance to sign up.

You must make sure the copystand has all the equipment before and after you work on the stand. Make sure to sign off on the "Equipment Inventory" sheet so if something is missing, you will not be blamed.


Course Objectives and Assessment

Topics

1. Short Assignments

Students will experiment with various techniques and produce short animations based on a concept

2. Reading Assignments

Reading assignments include both online and printed materials. All students are expected to

3. Group projects

Some short assignments will involve working in small groups. You must work out a schedule with your partners and work together as a team.

4. Research and Presentations

Students will be doing research on animators and animation principles and presenting them to class.

5. Final Project

For the final project students will create a 1-5 minute animation with title, soundtrack, and credits. Students can choose to work independently or in a group of 2 and they may use any combination of techniques introduced in this course. The piece can be narrative, poetic, abstract or very experimental.


Critiques

If you miss a regular critique, the project for that critique will be lowered by one letter grade. Late animations and other assignments will not be accepted without good reason as determined on a case-by-case basis by the professor.

Please advice the professor of any medical emergencies.

During critiques, I expect each student's full attention and respect. Monitors will be TURNED OFF during critiques. Critiques begin promptly at the beginning of the class.

Final Critique

Attendance at the Final critique is mandatory. Missing the final critique will result in an F for the Final Project. NO late Final Projects will be accepted!


Turning in Projects

Projects are due in the Homework folder prior to the beginning of class on the day they are due. Late projects will receive a zero if not turned in on time.

A (100-90)
Excellent - Above and beyond, artistically, conceptually AND technically

B (89-80)
Very Good - Beyond requirements, artistically, conceptually OR technically

C (79-70)
Average - Basically met the basic requirements - not great, not bad

D (69-60)
Did not meet requirements

F (59-0)
Project not turned in or completely insufficient


Policies

Digital Arts Department Rules

  • No food or drink in the lab.

  • Remember to turn off (or silence) your cellphone before class. No talk or texting during class.

  • No sleeping during class.

  • Any problems with hardware or software must be reported to a digital arts professor, preferably by email. Report should include Barcode number of the workstation and the exact details of the problem.

Student Projects

Projects created in any Digital Arts course may be used by the ART department for the purpose of promoting the student, the department and/or the university in general. These materials may also be used by the ART department for instructional purposes in future courses. Please inform the instructor if you do not want your projects used.


Academic Honesty

The professor and students in this course will adhere to the University’s general Codes of Conduct defined in the BGSU Student Handbook. The Code of Academic Conduct (Academic Honesty Policy) requires that students do not engage in academic dishonesty. For details, refer to the BGSU Codes of Conduct site at https://www.bgsu.edu/student-handbook/code-of-conduct.html.   

The professor and students will adhere to the general Code of Academic Conduct as outlined of the BGSU Student Handbook. Specifically, students will not cheat, fabricate, plagiarize or facilitate academic dishonesty. Students who passively engage in cheating (i.e. allowing others to cheat off of them) may receive the same consequences as the person copying. In group work, if your partner or teammates do all the work on an assignment, you should not be listed as a contributor and should receive no credit for that work. If you allow an assignment to be submitted listing you as a contributor, but you did not contribute, this is equivalent to plagiarism.


Disability Services

I want nothing to interfere with your ability to perform well in this course. If you have a significant problem that might weaken your performance, please talk to me and/or someone from Disability Services for Students (DSS) Office. The goal of the DSS is to help provide equal access and reasonable accommodations to BGSU students with disabilities.  You can contact them by phone at 372-8495, fax 372-8496, TTY 372-0582, or on the web at http://www.bgsu.edu/disability-services.html.


Religious Holidays

It is the policy of the University to make every reasonable effort to allow students to observe their religious holidays without academic penalty. In such cases, it is the obligation of the student to provide the instructor with reasonable notice of the dates of religious holidays on which he or she will be absent. Absence from classes or examinations for religious reasons does not relieve the student of responsibility for completing required work missed. Following the necessary notification, the student should consult with the instructor to determine what appropriate alternative opportunity will be provided, allowing the student to fully complete his or her academic responsibilities. (As stated in The Academic Charter, B-II.G-4.b at: http://www.bgsu.edu/downloads/file919.pdf.


Student-Veteran-Friendly Campus

BGSU educators recognize student veterans’ rights when entering and exiting the university system. If you are a student veteran, please communicate with your instructor so reasonable accommodations can be made for absence when drilling or being called to active duty. See (http://www.bgsu.edu/veteran/) for more information.