Project One Project Two

Project Three

Final Project

 

Note: There are chances of extending the contents of the lectures due to time allow and how fast students can absorb all materials.

http://beinart.org/index.php

http://digitalarts.bgsu.edu/cac/

Throughout the course, you will be expected to document your work by outputting completed animations on CD/DVD. You may be focusing on the enhancement of your portfolio throughout the course.

 

PROJECT 01: Your Arts

Due Date: Jan 12 and Jan. 17

Summary

Your will take inventory of your art and consider the work that best illustrates your current focus or direction. You will also do research on other artists who have connections to your work.

Objectives

For students take inventory of their current artistic direction.
For students to start understanding what they do best in imaging.
For students to begin to develop their artistic signature.
For students to start to understand what they want to say or do with their imaging.
For students to recognize other historical or contemporary artists who share similar techniques, content, or approaches with their own work.

Methodology

PART I Due Jan 12
Look at the important art that you have created so far and choose the work that best illustrates your current focus or direction. This could be an aesthetic direction, a technique you want to develop, or a theory you want to push further. The work does not have to be imaging, but you need to relate it to your work in imaging.

Bring this work to class on Day 2 and present it to the class, explaining what you have done and what you would like to work on.

Only bring a few works, no more than can be covered in 10 minutes.

Be prepared to show your work right away as we cannot waste time between presentations. If need be, load your work in your class folder on the server (ARTC 423).

PART II Due Jan 17
After reviewing your work, TYPE a short (1-2 pages) write-up that contains the following:
1) Your current artistic and technical focus and how that applies to imaging.
2) At least two artists whose work you identify with on some level. These artists can inspire you artistically, conceptually, technically, or any other way you can think of.

See the following resources, in addition to any other things you find:

Electronic Art and Animation Catalogue (EAAC) for SIGGRAPH:
EEAC

SpaceTime SIGGRAPH Student Exhibition Catalogue
SpaceTime 09
Click on the third bullet.

IDEAS exhibition catalogues:
IDEAS 08
IDEAS 07
IDEAS 06

BONUS: Include pictures from the artists you refer to.

Submission Requirements

PART I Due Jan 12
You are not required to turn in this work, but you may use your class folder for storage.

PART II Due Jan 17
Put a digital version of your write-up in the Assignment One class folder.
Name it lastname.doc

YOU MUST ALSO TURN IN A HARD COPY AND IT MUST BE TYPED.

Grading

You will be graded on the work and thought you put into organizing your work for the presentation and the amount of thought you put behind trying to determine an imaging direction. I will also consider how well you presented your ideas to the class.

You will also be graded on how well you wrote up your current artistic direction, the research you did on other artists and how they relate to your work and your SPELLING and GRAMMAR!

This assignment will be averaged with equal weight to the other assignments except the final, which will have a weight of 3.

Please note

Ask any questions in class or contact me by email or stop by office hours to clarify any questions you have about the assignment.

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PROJECT 02: Portraiture

 

Due Dates : Feb. 3 (digital) and Feb. 14 (Prints)

Summary

Create 2 to 6 images*, depending upon your methodology, that describes or embodies any person except you. The portraits must give us some kind of insight about the person. The works can be about the same person, different people, a made-up person, a representational person (or people), be about a person without showing a person, or any creative interpretation that you can defend.



Print four of your best works

*Note on number of images: There is some leeway in this requirement, depending on you process. All students are expected to either have 6 works done or defend and document their process to explain why they created fewer works. Clear it with me first and then put it in writing in a file saved with your assignment.

Objectives

To understand the notion of historical and contemporary portraiture
To develop a personal imaging aesthetic and voice and apply that to portraiture
To learn how to creatively interpret ideas
To learn how to depict a person beyond mere documentation

Further details and examples

TECHNICAL APPROACH

You are to use the technical approach that is most in line with your individual research. These might include:

Digital collage
Digital mixed media
Digital photo
Digital Painting
Digital Drawing

CONCEPTUAL APPROACH

Summary:
Consider the brief digest below of different (mostly) American approaches to making portraits. Decide what works best for your art or what seems interesting for you to try. Portraiture is VAST and the following examples will direct you. If you are at a loss, I will assign an approach to you.



Early American: The portrait as a formal document

Colonial to Nineteenth century: Paintings are done by sign and house painters. The earliest artists were self-taught. Artists were commissioned by the wealthy and these people were often pictured with their possessions. Portraits also served the same purpose as a photograph document might today.

See
Charles Willson Peale

Edward Savage

Thomas Sully
See especially Lady with a Harp: Eliza Ridgely

Joseph Whiting Stock (Folk Paintings)

A bit later, portraits started to capture personality. It was also in vogue to paint famous people.

See:
Gilbert Stuart

More Gilbert Stuart

John Singleton Copley

Portraits REALLY change when photography hits mainstream

Late 1800's brought on more impressionistic portraits that captured moments in time.

See:
Mary Casatt
More Mary Casatt
More Mary Casatt
More Mary Casatt
Find more on your own. These are more than moments in time, but depict aspects of being a woman that were heretofore undocumented.
John Singer Sargent
More John Singer Sargent
More John Singer Sargent

Also in late 1800's realism was popular and portraits not only showed personality, but psychological insight.
See:
Thomas Eakins

20th century: Enter abstraction and with it came cubism and high modern approaches.
See:
Pablo Picasso
More Pablo Picasso

Joan Miro
NOTE: how this portrait represents a stereotype, it could be a number of people including the artists.
More Joan Miro

Like the other 20th century examples above, from here on, portraiture no longer solely fulfills a documentary function, but explores complex social and cultural issues.

Other 20th century:

Fictional or representational identity:

Duchamp as Rrose Selavy by Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray

Cindy Sherman

Culture and identity
Barkley Leonnard Hendricks

Popular culture and celebrities as mass consumption
Andy Warhol

Anne Lebovitz Shows us the human or intimate side of celebrities
More Anne Lebovitz

Diane Arbus (cultural fringes or the bizarre)
More Diane Arbus

Mary Ellen Mark(also social issues)

Family and intimacy:
Emmet Gowin

Sally Mann

Digital artists:

Unknown Artist


Maggie Taylor

Loretta Lux (a digital photographer)

Heather Freeman

Helen Golden (see figuratives portfolio)

Jacki Morie (see Evidence Series)

Davida Kidd (see Base Imprints and Core Dump)

Victor Koen
Also see Google image results

Victor Koen Victor Koen



Time based portraits:
Chris Landreth

"Ryan" is an animation of the life of Ryan Larkin, a Canadian animator who, 30 years ago, produced some of the most influential animated films of his time. This film is about his addiction.

Ryan, the animation

Ladreth's newest animation: Spine
This is about a relationship between a husband and wife in which the man is lacking a "spine." The film investigates how and when the man lost his spine and the possibility of growing it back. The animation is not online now, but the making of "Spine" is. Note how Landreth makes portraits of the various characters in the animation and how they LOOK like what and who they represent.

Bits and pictures from the "Spine" animation

Andy Warhol
Screentests (1964-1966): Depicting Nothing!
Warhol asked Factory visitors who had potential "star" quality to sit in front of a tripod mounted camera and to be as still as possible. He told them not to blink while the camera was running. Basically, he asked them to do nothing. Were they actually doing something? What would a portrait of "doing nothing" look like?

One short film that came out of the screen tests:

The Thirteen Most Beautiful Boys

Submission Requirements :

DIgital Images Due Dates : Feb. 3

Create a folder with your name on it in the Assignment 3 folder in the class folder. Put your images in this folder ON THE DUE DATE. You may make alterations up to two days after the due date, but the final works must be turned in on the due date. No image should be greater than 5 MB and should be in the jpg format.

Prints Due Dates : Feb. 14

Bring your completed prints (4) to class on the due date for a short critique.

Grading :

You will be graded on your ability to complete all parts of the assignment ON TIME.

You will be graded on concept, formal qualities (composition, color, etc.), and technical mastery.

This assignment will be averaged with equal weight to the other assignments except the final, which will have a weight of 3.

Please note :

Ask any questions in class or contact me by email or stop by office hours to clarify any questions you have about the assignment.

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PROJECT 03: Story Telling and Narrative in Still Imagery

Due Date: March 13 (digital) and March 20 (prints)

Summary

Create 6 (or more) images that are a story or narrative of sorts, that is, each image or the entire sequence implies a story. By "imply" I mean that the story can be clear and literal, it can be loose and open-ended, it can reference other known stories or events, or it can elicit a feeling of things that may or may not happen next. Note that you may use the sequence of images to tell the story (like Duane Michaels) or you might choose to tell a different story in each image (like Edward Hopper). In the latter case, make sure the individual stories are related by theme, content or style. For example, Hopper's paintings refer to different events, but we know they are all Hopper paintings.

Suggestions for getting started

Think about images that you already made that you want to expand as a story. You might also think about stories in the past that you have written such as a storybook or time based video or animation, and think about how you could re-tell that story in one image. You may also consider the areas that already interest you (politics, nature etc.) and make images that tell stories about those particular concerns. This assignment is very open ended and the notion of story is as broad as you want to make it.

Notes on STORY TELLING

When we think of stories or narratives, we often think of books or some narration that exists over time, for example, movies, videos, or film. Consider a story contained in one single frame. What does time have to do with this kind of story, is time infinite? What about a story over three images, Must it be literal? What is a story? What are some of the differences between a story told over time, like animation or an interactive work, and a story told in an image? What are some of the challenges? How can you use color, shape, form, texture, and character lines to tell a story?

Think of these questions when you make this body of work.

Objectives

To understand narrative and story in imagery. To see how narrative and story already exist (or not) in still imagery. To continue to develop a mature individual aesthetic and voice in digital imaging. To develop specific techniques related to individual goals.

Methodology

IMAGES
Create 6 (or more) images that are a story or narrative. Use any approach to imaging; image acquisition, digital painting, digital collage, digital photo, scanning, vector imaging, mixed media, or a combination.

Examples of narrative imagery:

Duane Michaels
see 1, 7, 11, 12, 14

Edward Hopper

Francis Bacon, Triptych - August 1972

Winslow Homer, The Gulf Stream, 1899

From SIGGRAPH 2003
DIANE FENSTER: From the series: Your Dreams And Omens Revealed, which are anecdotal stories that translate as predictions of the future and interpretations of the past.
QUINTIN GONZALEZ, Ghost Of Time, which is serial-like imagery that reads like a narrative
PATRICK LITCHEY, whose work is a series of stills from a low end time based camera.

Francis Bacon, Triptych - August 1972

Submission Requirements

Images Due Date: March 13
Create a folder with your name on it in the Assignment 2 folder in the class folder. Images should not be larger than 5MB and saved as a jpeg.

When you present your work:

Not only would I like you to show and talk about your work, but also discuss if you make images differently or not given the intention of telling stories. Was it already something you were doing or is this way of working new for you? Consider your intitial intentions through to the end result.

Grading

You will be graded on concept, formal qualities (composition, color, etc.), and technical mastery. For this assignment, concept means how well you interpret and defend your notion of story or narrative in still imagery and how apparent it is in your resulting work.

This assignment will be averaged with equal weight to the other assignments except the final, which will have a weight of 3.

Note:

Ask any questions in class or contact me by email or stop by office hours to clarify any questions you have about the assignment.

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Final Project:

Due Date: April 26th (digital) and May 3rd (prints)

Summary

Create 4 images that are a body of work and will be printed and displayed in an alternative or traditional way. I want you to focus on content first, and then perfect a technique or techniques that you need in order to make these successful images.

The concept of your project can be about whatever you feel is necessary. This artwork should be engaging, original, and pushes the boundary conceptually, aesthetically, and technically. It should be about something that is important to you, and something that you want to say through your artwork to viewers.

Objectives

To continue to develop a personal imaging aesthetic and voice
To continue to perfect your understanding of prints
To develop a final body of work and understand what that means
To develop specific techniques related to individual goals

Methodology

PART I
Contract
Write a contract that specifies
1. The idea or content behind this body of work.
2. Your aesthetic approach (Digital painting, drawing, collage,photography, etc.)
3. Your output goal, or how many images you will make. This is related to your working method.


PART II
Images
You will create 4 (or a different number we agree on, depending on your method) images that go together as a "body" of work. By this I mean that they are related in content and aesthetics and read together as a series. The content should, but does not need to be, an extension of your midterm.

Submission Requirements

PART I
Bring a hard copy of your contract to class on the due date.

PART II
Create a folder with your name on it in the Final folder in the class folder. Put your 4 (or agreed number) images in this folder. No image should be greater than 5 MB and should be tiff format.

PART III
Bring your completed prints to class on the due date and we will have our critique from those prints.

Grading

You will be graded on your ability to complete all parts of the assignment.

You will be graded on concept, formal qualities (composition, color, etc.), and technical mastery.

This assignment will be averaged with equal weight to the other assignments except the final, which will have a weight of 3.

Note:

Ask any questions in class or contact me by email or stop by office hours to clarify any questions you have about the assignment.

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update Jan. 07, 2012